Angel’s Envy Bourbon – Review #47

Angel’s Envy Background

Angel's Envy BourbonAngel’s Envy was launched by Lincoln and Wes Henderson after he spent 39 years at Brown-Forman. He started at Brown-Forman as a chemist and worked his way up to Master Distiller. He’s credited as helping to bring major products to market such as Woodford Reserve and Gentleman Jack. After he retired, he and his son Wes started the new brand Angel’s Envy.

Angel’s Envy is a unique startup. They source this Bourbon and then barreled it in port casks for Portugal. The Bourbon is finished for about 6 months after aged 6-7 years in American white oak.

The goal of Angel’s Envy was to make a whiskey that was more subtle and refined. The addition of finishing the Bourbon in port casks offers a unique flavor and body for a mild Bourbon.

Details

No age statement, but said to be 6-7 Years Old. Bottled at 80-proof. About 15-20% rye. Paid $46.

Aroma

Caramel, Vanilla, Fruity aromatics. Red table wine. Light charred oak. A little mint.

Flavor

Sweet, fruity, candy apples. Red wine. Plums. A bit of mint. A little citrus. Fruit Stripe gum. I don’t even know the last time I had that. Some corn. Delicate with a punch of sweet fruitiness. A touch of warming in the finish.

Overall

This is a store selection barrel. I picked it up from Big Red in Indianapolis last year when I was in town for the Big Ten championship game. So, your mileage may vary a bit on my tasting.

This seems well executed with some nice character from the finishing port barrels. Only real issue is it’s light. The body appears a bit viscous, but it’s still light in flavor and overall body. I’d love to try this at a higher proof. It’s a dangerous sipper, especially on a warm evening like tonight.

As I understand it, the goal was to make a Bourbon with mass appeal. In this regard I think it hits the mark. Like a beer intended to be a crowd pleaser, Angel’s Envy may not appeal to everyone all the time. Appreciating it for what it is, it’s a nice sipper at a modernly premium price. Based on the price, being a little unusual with a barrel finish, and its light nature, I’ll going to recommend try this one before buying.

Recommendation

Try a Glass – 2.5 out of 5.0 Rating

(My 5 point scale: Pass, Try a Glass, Buy a Bottle, Buy Again, Shut Up and Take My Money – Bottle price is taken into consideration for recommendations.)

Buying Options and Further Research

Angel’s Envy is unique with it’s barrel finish, but we’ll grade it as a standard Bourbon. Some similar Bourbons in the price range also worth looking into include Baker’s, Wild Turkey Kentucky Spirit, and John J Bowman.

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Wild Turkey Kentucky Spirit – Review #46

Kentucky Spirit Background

Wild Turkey Kentucky SpiritWild Turkey Kentucky Spirit takes claim of the second modern single barrel Bourbon. Blanton’s is the first, although there were most likely earlier bottles from a single barrel. But for practical purposed within the realm of modern Bourbon as we know it, they’re #1 and #2.

Kentucky Spirit has the same bottling proof of Wild Turkey 101. The different would seem to be barrel selection and age. Wild Turkey 101 is a bottling of barrels blended together with ages of 6, 7 and 8 years old. Kentucky Spirit is a little older at 8-9.5 years old. And that barrel selection should be good as Master Distiller Jimmy Russell picks them out himself.

Wild Turkey line is unique with its robust flavors. Likely attributed to the lower entry proof going into the barrel. The lower proof means it’s less refined coming off the still, which means it carries more flavors from the mash and fermentation. Also lending to flavors is a heavy #4 alligator barrel char.

Details

8-9.5 Years Old. Bottled at 101-proof. Bottled on 6/14/13 from barrel #48 in Warehouse C on rick #66. Mash recipe of 75% corn, 13% rye, and 12% barley. Paid $48

Aroma

Caramel and cinnamon. Some cocoa. A little spearmint. Brown sugar. Oak.

Flavor

Sweetness, nice caramel cinnamon, and vanilla profile. Corn. Brown sugar. Burnt sugars. Graininess. Assertive charred oak  and a touch of astringency. Spicy and bold.

Overall

Distinctly wild turkey. This is a flavor bomb with assertive barrel flavors and lots of sweet caramel and vanilla. The burnt sugars I’m getting are a little harsh, I think. All these flavors hold up just fine to water and I think I like a dash in this one to dial down that heavy char. This is pretty flavorful.

Comparing this to Wild Turkey 101, I think Kentucky Spirit has more a pronounced caramel and vanilla profile. Also I’m getting more brown sugar. 101 seems a little more fruity to me and there might be a hint of acetone that’s absent in Kentucky Spirit in side-by-side. If I had to summarize the two, I’d say Kentucky Spirit is a bit more refined although packs more flavor on some levels. I’m going to give this the same rating as Wild Turkey 101. I like Kentucky Spirit better, but pricing difference is elevating Wild Turkey 101. If you like 101, Kentucky Spirit should make for a nice pour for a special occasion.

Recommendation

Buy Again – 4.0 out of 5.0

(My 5 point scale: Pass, Try a Glass, Buy a Bottle, Buy Again, Shut Up and Take My Money – Bottle price is taken into consideration for recommendations.)

Buying Options and Further Research

This is a standard rye Bourbon and you’ve got a number of other good options in this category and price tag. If you want to compare this to a few other bottles, I’d suggest checking out John J Bowman, Angel’s Envy, and Baker’s. Of course you can also check out the much cheaper Wild Turkey 101, which would probably be a good place to start.

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Henry McKenna Single Barrel – Review

Henry McKenna Single Barrel Background

Henry McKenna Single BarrelHenry McKenna was a Kentucky farmer who began making whiskey in 1855. He brought his recipe with him when he emigrated from Ireland and after his death his sons continued the family distillery. Henry McKenna Single Barrel 10 Year Old is a tribute to Henry, but that is all. It’s made today by Heaven Hill as a bottled-in-bond product. In fact, Heaven Hill claims it’s the only “extra-aged” BIB single barrel Bourbon on the market. Bottled-in-bond means legally the Bourbon must come from a single distillery, in the same season, bottled at 100-proof, and aged in a federally supervised warehouse for at least four years.

This bottle here is actually the older design. The Bourbon itself is the same, but last year Heaven Hill updated the look of the packaging to be a little less arts and crafty. This is kind of weird look, but I suppose it might stand out on the shelf.  Either way, the new bottle looks like an improvement, but I won’t hold that against this whiskey.

Details

10 Years Old. Bottled at 100-proof. Mash of 75% corn, 13% rye, and 12% barley. Paid $30

Aroma

Caramel. Toffee. Fruity. A little buttery and nutty. Smoky oak. Touch of perfume.

Flavor

Sweet and caramel. Cherry syrup. Vanilla, Roasted coffee. maple syrup, brown sugar.  Some hot cinnamon. Barrel char. Oak and astringency towards the finish. Nice flavors.

Overall

Henry McKenna Single Barrel is a nice flavorful Bourbon.  A lot of flavors here towards a rich sweet pour. It has nice barrel character that balances out the sweetness a bit, but still seems pretty sweet and refreshing. For me it’s also on the edge of some fruity fusel alcohol, but still good.

I compared Henry McKenna Single Barrel to Evan Williams Single Barrel, which seem pretty similar and both out of Heaven Hill. I think i prefer the Evan Williams 2003 better overall, but it’s close. Both are single barrel expressions and close to the same age, so I could see a little variation may flip the two. They’re both similarly priced, so I’d say just pick up which ever you can find or maybe one of each and just enjoy them both as they’re nice values. If you’re looking for a reasonably priced daily sipper, at 10 years old, 100 proof, and a single barrel bottle, Henry McKenna is a good bet.

Recommendation

Buy Again – 4.0/5.0 Rating

(My 5 point scale: Pass, Try a Glass, Buy a Bottle, Buy Again, Shut Up and Take My Money – Bottle price is taken into consideration for recommendations.)

Buying Options and Further Research

We already covered Evan Williams Single Barrel. Some similar standard rye Bourbons around this price worth also checking out include Elijah Craig 12, Bowman Brothers, Russell’s Reserve 10, Elmer T Lee, Knob Creek Small Batch, and Woodford Reserve. As you can see there are a lot of options in this category near this price.

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Rhetoric 20 Year Bourbon – Review #44

Rhetoric 20 Background

Rhetoric 20 BottleDiageo’s Orphan Barrel is back with its third bottling in a 20-year-old Bourbon called Rhetoric. I previously looked at Barterhouse, which was also a 20 year old Bourbon, and the third was Old Blowhard.

Rhetoric 20 is a straight Kentucky Bourbon pulled from the famous Stizel-Weller warehouses. It was distilled at both the old and new Bernheim distilleries between 1990 and 1993. Barterhouse was distilled at the new Bernheim and also aged at Stizel-Weller. Rhetoric 20 apparently has some older barrels distilled at the old Bernheim, which might be why it’s $10 more than Barterhouse. Also Rhetoric 20 has a real cork while Barterhouse had synthetic, so I guess there’s also that.

Rhetoric will be released in progressive ages. So this year we have a 20-year-old bottle and next year will be a 21-year release. The plan is to have six releases, so that will be interesting to see a 25-year bottle of this in 2019. It’s probably safe to assume that each release will be more expense than the last.

The bottle matches the previous Orphan Barrel designs and here we have a pretty nice looking label. With each future release, the bottle will retain the same design, but the background will get darker in reference to the older age.

Details

20 Years old. Bottled at 45%. Mash bill of 86% corn, 6% rye, and 8% barley. Bottle # 346. Paid $85.

Aroma

Rich toasted oak and sawdust. Deep caramel and rich vanilla. Fruity, sticky sweet smelling with cherries. Spearmint.

Flavor

Maple, smokey. Sweetness. Caramel and vanilla. Rich. Nice woody oak. Cinnamon. Fruity apples and cherries. Coffee. Soft finish that’s mildly minty and that fades into firm drying astringency.

Overall

Rhetoric 20 is a nice little treat. With anything 20 years old, it’s not going to be for everyone, but there’s nice complexity here with sweet caramel and nice a nice smokey maple. That’s followed up by fruity cinnamon, and then some rye presence and finally the oak fills in the gaps. Yeah, it lacks life of a Bourbon half its age, but it’s nice to mix thing up once in a while and this is a pretty nice option.

I poured a second glass of Barterhouse for comparison and I like Rhetoric 20 better. Barterhouse has a little more heat, I think, which gives it some character, but Rhetoric 20 seems a little better put together. I had no real complaints with Barterhouse and gave it a buy a bottle rating. I think Barterhouse was worth picking up just for the experience, at least at list price, and Rhetoric 20 is something I might be more interested in keeping around.

It will be interesting to see how this Rhetoric 20 progresses year to year. I’d be a little concerned at adding a lot more oak to it, but today for $85, this is a nice pour. It certainly goes down easy. If I find another bottle near this price, I’ll probably pick up a spare.

Recommendation

Buy Again – 4.0/5.0 Rating

(My 5 point scale: Pass, Try a Glass, Buy a Bottle, Buy Again, Shut Up and Take My Money – Bottle price is taken into consideration for recommendations.)

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